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cleaning_chenille

 

cleaning chenille bedspreads & care of vintage chenille bedspreads

Cleaning chenille bedspreads:

I recently had someone ask me how to care for and clean chenille bedspreads so I will do my best to tell you how I do it.

You go to this garage sale and find a beautiful vintage chenille bedspread that looks like it has been through the war. You check it over and find there is little damage except for the stains and grime. So now your going to be cleaning chenille bedspreads. (This is for the really bad ones) You bring it home and hope to save it. Fill the tub with luke warm water. I use a dry detergent called Biz and add that, a large amount. Add about a cup full of Clorox and a couple of cups of vinegar and stir the mixture up before you put the spread in. Carefully swirl it around off and on, be careful as they will tear if you put too much pressure on them as they are wet and weigh a ton. When cleaning chenille bedspreads you have to be patient. Check on it off and on but let it soak good. If it looks like it is coming clean wait till your sure there aren't any really bad stains, something the washer will not take out. I've even added baking soda and more vinegar (lots more vinegar, it's cheap) when they are real tough. I've let them soak for as much as 2 days. If you have bleach in the mix don't let them go over a day. Be patient. To remove it from the tub and put it in the washer let all the water out and push on it till you get most of the water out. Put it into a plastic laundry basket with a solid bottom and a couple of inches of sides and hurry to the washer. Finish it in the washer in warm water with a cold rinse. ALWAYS ADD LIQUID FABRIC SOFTENER IN THE RINSE CYCLE. This is the important part for a soft bedspread. You can line dry till it's just damp and finish it in the dryer on hot to fluff or dry it in the dryer all the way. Make sure you check the lint filter often as it fills up quickly.

Here are some more tips for cleaning chenille bedspreads:

The dollar store carries a great spot remover called Awesome for $1.00 of course and it works great on spots when cleaning chenille bedspreads.

When you have the spread washed check it over very good before you put it in the dryer as the dryer will set stains. If it's still wet you still have a chance of getting the stains out.

On small blood stains that didn't come out in my soak or I missed them, I use almost straight Clorox on a q-tip (only if it's on the white)and then put peroxide on it. Repeat till it's gone or almost gone. Then rinse with water. The sun will usually finish it off if it's lined dried.  I just found another cleaner that takes out old blood.  It's called Wash Away by Whink, the makers of the rust remover.  It might take days so always keep it moist, rinse often and re-apply.

If you have a white spread that the yellow just won't come out (it usually will) you can always dye it but if you do, follow the directions to a T on the box of dye. The spread has to be completely wet, no dry spots. Use liquid dye if possible.

This is all I can think of for now but if you have anything you have run across successful or not, please email me and we'll talk.

Vintage chenille bedspreads can be used on a daily basis if cared for properly, here are some do's and don'ts on the care of vintage chenille bedspreads:

Fold down the top at night and don't pull on it.

Don't sit on the side of the bed to put your shoes on, or the bottom or any where else.

Don't lay on the top of the bedspread, it wears the chenille, usually on the lighter weight ones but I have seen heavy weight ones ruined too.

If you bleach, always make sure the bleach is mixed in the water before the bedspread goes in. Don't bleach on a regular basis, only when needed.

If you see a small hole, stich it up before washing. Even if you feel you can't sew, a bad stich up is better than no stich-up. The hole will get bigger if not taken care of immediately. Just go for it.

If anyone has any additions to these, please let me know.

Thanks for reading, Anne